scott's law, law enforcement, slow down, move over, illinois state police, illinois sheriffs

Sheriff departments in Illinois kick off Traffic Awareness Campaign

ILLINOIS-- Nineteen state troopers throughout the United States have been hit on roads already this year. Four troopers including, Trooper Brooke Jones-Story , have been hit and killed in Illinois.

In the aftermath of these deaths, Sheriff's across the state of Illinois will be working together in a traffic awareness campaign because for them, four lost troopers is one to many.

This coming week, departments are focusing on Scott's Law. Distracted driving safety tips will be coming in the next few weeks to better protect everyone on the road.

Starting today until the April 19, officers will be out reminding drivers that, when they are approaching an emergency vehicle with flashing lights, they need to give them space and move over a lane or even two if it is possible during traffic.

"It's absolutely imperative that the community we are out there protecting looks out for us just the same, making sure they move over. If they don't have the ability to move over because of traffic flow, slow down, be courteous and respectful and be conscious of your surroundings," Capt. Ron Erickson, with the Rock Island Sheriff's Office said.

Erickson says law enforcement is like a family, so any death hits each member hard.

Troopers are also pushing for drivers to stay off of their phones while driving. Distracted driving makes it harder to see what is in front of you. This decrease reaction speed.

"It's just paying attention, and a tough part too is teenage drivers. They don't have the experience first and foremost, and they are four times more likely to get into an accident involving death just because of their inexperience and maturity levels," Erickson said.

Law enforcement from all agencies will be out issuing citations for drivers not following Scott's Law.

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