Quad Cities Women’s March aims to get women to the polls

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ROCK ISLAND-- Thousand's nationwide are marching including here in the Quad Cities.

"Bring an open heart and an open mind you're going to hear stories from people you might have not heard otherwise," said Laura Rodriguez, Quad Cities Women's March organizer.

On the anniversary on the First Women's March in D.C hundreds turned out  at Schweibert Park for the Quad Cities Women's March.  From young to old with signs in hand both women and men advocated for their beliefs.

"It's important as African American women, as women in general, as women that are leading the household in this day and time because if we don't fight for our rights who else will," said Tee Leshoure, President of African American Lesbians Proffessionals Having a Say (AALPHAS) organization.

Local activists spoke out on issues such as racial and gender inequality, immigration reform, LGBTQIA, environmental issues and more.

"While it is called a women's march, we have worked very hard to make it so it represents people from all different communities," said Carrie Clark, Quad Cities Women's March organizer.

They're reasons to march are different but they all have one goal in mind to get more women to the polls. Booths were setup for people to register from both sides of the river.

From Schweibert Park they marched to the County Clerk's Office.

"I feel like as the daughter of an immigrant, daughter of a U.S Army Veteran, as a mother of a special needs child, as a retail worker, I'm directly impacted (...) it's personal for me," said Laura Rodriguez, organizer and local activist for the Quad Cities Democratic Socialists of America.

Since the first women's march activists say they've seen people coming forward for change.

"We won't go away we'll continue to fight each and every year if we have to show up in thousands of numbers in millions of numbers we will show up," said LeShoure.

Overall marchers hope to continue the movement and making sure their voices are heard.

"We won't go away we'll continue to fight each and every year if we have to show up in thousands of numbers in millions of numbers we will show up, we will be there we will continue to fight we won't go away," said LeShoure.