References to climate change removed from EPA’s website… again

WASHINGTON, D.C.-- Information about climate change is getting harder and harder to find on the Environmental Protection Agency's website.

This weekend, the EPA scrubbed even more references to climate change from its website, a move inline with EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's own beliefs.

"I don't know what it means to deny the climate," Pruitt explained when he first became Administrator. "I would say there are climate exaggerators."

Pruitt rejects the scientific consensus that human activities are a primary contributor to climate change.

Now, when you click the "Climate Change" link on the EPA's website, you'll find it's being updated "to reflect the agency's priorities under the leadership of President Trump." Links on "climate change resilience" and "how to adapt to climate change" are gone, too.

An analysis by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative uncovered the change. The group regularly monitors tens of thousands of federal environmental agency web pages to document what has been changed or scrubbed. It released a report December 8th, noting changes to the website in the fall, including links to the EPA’s climate change adaptation plan and policy that have been removed.

However, there are more than 5,000 results when the term “climate change” is searched on the EPA’s website.

Here are some of the changes reported by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative:

  • On the above page, several references to climate change have been removed. Previously, it had listed “climate change resilience” as one of the EPA’s strategic plans in August. It had also contained two links to EPA’s climate change adaptation plan and its policy statement on climate change adaptation, which are no longer there.
  • On another web page, the reference to how the EPA was the “first major ​federal ​agency ​to ​purchase renewable ​energy ​equal ​to ​100% ​of ​its ​estimated ​annual ​electricity ​use ​nationwide” has been removed.
  • That same statistic about how the EPA uses renewable energy equal to 100% of its estimated annual electricity use, has been edited out on another web page.

There is no evidence that the EPA is crossing any legal red lines by removing the information from its website.

According to NASA, 97% of the world's scientists acknowledge climate change as fact and name human activity as the primary cause.

NASA also says 2016 the hottest year on record, and the 10 hottest years in history have all happened since 1998.