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Quad City reaction to the end of the DACA program

MOLINE - Nearly one million people's lives in the United States have become uncertain with the end of the deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA) program. 

"Somebody takes you up on that promise and then they re-nag on that promise, it's immoral, this is a humanitarian issue," said Maria Bribriesco, Deputy State Director, LULAC.

With the end of the program it sets a clock for congress to maintain the programs protections.

"Right now, things are a little up in the air, we're just hoping that the legislators will be considerate, come up with a plan here in the near future," said George Barajas, Board Member, Quad City Alliance for Immigrants and Refugees.

Congress has been given six months before DACA recipients will begin losing their status, which some believe is a blessing in disguise.

"I believe that president Trump has given us a gift and I believe that it's congresses job to pass the legislation," said Bribriesco.

The next six months will be unsettling for those who rely on DACA for protection.

"The majority were brought here as little kids and they all were raised here and have gone to school here all their lives," said Baraja.

However, Bribriesco believes that congress will work together on this issue, "there's bipartisan support to take care of the dreamers, I don't think anybody has the heart to deport these young people who only know one country."

Both organizations say they'll be working on speaking to legislators to get a bill passed.