For the first time ever Illinois misses scheduled payments for schools

MONMOUTH, Illinois - School districts across the state were counting on a payment in the mail today from the state, but that didn't happen.

Now some school districts will have to go to extreme lengths to keep schools open.

On Thursday, August 10th, the Monmouth-Roseville School District held a town hall meeting to let that community know what kind of shape it's in.

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner and Democratic lawmakers can't agree on a school funding formula. Lawmakers passed an education bill called SB1 but the Governor amendatory vetoed it because he says part of the bill is a bailout for Chicago schools.

For Monmouth-Roseville, they were counting on a big check from the state.

"Disappointed, sad, angry, lots of different terms to use for us. It's a little over 327,000 that if I use last years numbers we did not receive," said Superintendent Ed Fletcher.

In the crowd of people at the town hall meeting sat Lori Menke and her son Gunnar.

"We really don`t know whats going to happen and he`s a sophomore and I really want him to finish and graduate with his class," said Lori.

Without state money, the Monmouth-Roseville School district will need to go to extremes to pay for school.

"At the end of the semester we would be reaching out to local banks for lines of credit or doing tax anticipation notes or working cash fund bonds to try to get through the remainder of the school year," said Fletcher.

Parents like Lori and Students like Gunnar say they should be preparing for the state of the school year and not worry if it will abruptly end when the district runs out of cash.

"They're kids, they shouldn't have to worry about this," said Lori.

School starts the 23rd for students. The second payment from the state is due just three days before that.

The State Senate will return to Springfield on Sunday, aiming to override the Governor's veto.

Now some school districts will have to go to extreme lengths to keep schools open.

On Thursday, August 10th, the Monmouth-Roseville School District held a town hall meeting to let that community know what kind of shape it's in.

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner and Democratic lawmakers can't agree on a school funding formula. Lawmakers passed an education bill called SB1 but the Governor amendatory vetoed it because he says part of the bill is a bailout for Chicago schools.

For Monmouth-Roseville, they were counting on a big check from the state.

"Disappointed, sad, angry, lots of different terms to use for us. It's a little over 327,000 that if I use last year's numbers we did not receive," said Superintendent Ed Fletcher.

In the crowd of people at the town hall meeting sat Lori Menke and her son Gunnar.

"We really don`t know whats going to happen and he`s a sophomore and I really want him to finish and graduate with his class," said Lori.

Without state money, the Monmouth-Roseville School district will need to go to extremes to pay for school.

"At the end of the semester we would be reaching out to local banks for lines of credit or doing tax anticipation notes or working cash fund bonds to try to get through the remainder of the school year," said Fletcher.

Parents like Lori and Students like Gunnar say they should be preparing for the state of the school year and not worry if it will abruptly end when the district runs out of cash.

"They're kids, they shouldn't have to worry about this," said Lori.

School starts the 23rd for students. The second payment from the state is due just three days before that.

The State Senate will return to Springfield on Sunday, aiming to override the Governor's veto.