Social media is sign of the times for Iowa and Illinois campaigns

MOLINE, Illinois -

At Republican Headquarters in Moline, It's a sign of the times.

Campaign signs that call out for candidates on Election Day.

"It's been sparse," said Ron Schriefer, Moline.

Campaign signs are so sparse in some neighborhoods, it's hard to find any on display.

"You just don't see the political signs the way you have in past years," added Jane Anderson, Moline.

Turns out, there's a reason.

More campaigns find that yard signs tend to clutter the message (and neighborhoods).

"Yeah, we're definitely seeing less," Anderson said.

Campaigns are turning more to social media and getting more bang for the buck through websites, Facebook, Twitter and more.

"For about the price of one good yard sign, you can touch a couple thousand people," said Bill Bloom, chairman of Rock Island Republicans.

It's busy at the Hillary Clinton campaign office in Davenport on Friday.

"We sign people up to volunteer and then give them a yard sign," said Regional Director Chelsea Carrier.

Old-school yard signs are giving way to a more sophisticated and strategic way to reach voters.

"As far as visibility and showing people, wow, I really need to vote for this person and get excited about it, social media and having an online presence is huge," she continued.

After some searching in Davenport, we found yard signs for national, state and local races.

There are still signs for both major parties and a variety of candidates.

Targeted door-knocking and personal outreach continue to be important.

"People like to know that they're important enough that the candidate walks up to their front sidewalk, knocks on their door and lets them know who they are," Bloom said.

Signs and campaign buttons may be giving way to social media and boots-on-the-ground footwork.

"Yard signs and online ads don't vote," Carrier concluded.  "People do."