Here’s how you can see this year’s “honey” moon

2013 Honey Moon photo by Stephen Rahn from uniersetoday.com

2013 Honey Moon photo by Stephen Rahn from uniersetoday.com

The night leading into Friday the 13th is a lucky time for anyone who wants to see the full “Honey Moon.”

It’s commonly dubbed a Honey Moon because, as the last full moon before the summer solstice, it takes on an amber tint, similar to the color of honey.

The National Weather Service says that color happens because we’re seeing the moon through more of Earth’s atmosphere than during other months.

The Honey Moon is the last full moon before the summer solstice, which falls on Saturday, June 21 in 2014.

See and share photos of your moon sightings – click here.

The moon is visible low in the southern horizon if you’re watching in the northern hemisphere, but it’s high in the sky for observers south of the equator.

The combination of a full moon, on a Friday the 13th, in the month of June, is a once-in-a-lifetime event. A full moon happens on the 13th day of any month about every two to three years; but the last time a full moon happened on a Friday the 13th, in the month of June, was in 1919 according to Universe Today, which also reports the next time a full moon will happen on Friday the 13th, in the month of June, will be 2098.

The Honey Moon will rise late Thursday night, June 12, and set Friday morning, June 13.

If you’re worried about clouds blocking your view, Slooh planned to stream the Honey Moon live starting at 10 p.m. Thursday, June 12. You can watch their live stream online and in the video player below.

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