Terry’s Take: Easter Sunday Tornado Tragedy of 1913

Posted on: 4:43 pm, March 28, 2013, by , updated on: 10:24pm, March 28, 2013

Terry Swails Weather Blog

Easter Sunday, March 23 marks the 100th anniversary of a violent tornado outbreak which swept across the Midwest destroying everything in sight, killing 168 people and injuring 590 others. Beginning at 5:20 p.m., a series of F4 tornadoes touched down in Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri.

The outbreak followed on the heels of another series of twisters that had hit during the preceding couple of days, making for an exceptionally frightening and deadly weekend.

TWISTER STRIKES OMAHA EASTER SUNDAY 1903

TWISTER STRIKES OMAHA EASTER SUNDAY 1903

The deadliest tornado of the swarm was a quarter to half mile wide twister that passed through Omaha, Nebraska, at 6 p.m., killing 103 people, 94 in that city alone. The storm destroyed much of the northern end of the city, cutting a path through town more than five blocks wide. The storm reduced both slums and mansions alike to rubble, cutting some buildings neatly in half as it passed through. One fast-thinking streetcar driver managed to outrun the storm, saving the lives of his passengers.

TRACKS AND DEATH TOLL OF 6 MAJOR TORNADOES

TRACKS AND DEATH TOLL OF 6 MAJOR TORNADOES

MASSIVE DEVASTATION AFTER THE STORM

MASSIVE DEVASTATION AFTER THE STORM

The tornado that hit Omaha was the 13th deadliest in the recorded history of the United States, and the deadliest to hit Nebraska. In addition, the outbreak as a whole remains the most deadly outbreak to strike so early in the year.

RESIDENTS SURVEY THE DAMAGE

RESIDENTS SURVEY THE DAMAGE

During the event, more than 2,000 homes were destroyed in Omaha alone, causing more than $8 million total damage. 5 other major tornadoes killed another 65 people in Nebraska and western Iowa.The plight of those left homeless by the storm was worsened by the fact that extremely cold weather followed on its heels, bringing snow and punishing winds.

SNOW COVERED RUINS FOLLOWING THE TORNADO

SNOW COVERED RUINS FOLLOWING THE TORNADO

One result of the outbreak was an attempt to engineer tornado-proof buildings. The 14-story First National Bank of Omaha, built in 1916, represented one such attempt. Architect’s hoped its unique “U”-shape would protect it from future destruction. So far, so good!